Wood Flooring Install

Wood flooring is glued at its joints into what is known as a “floating floor”, which means that it is not fixed to the sub-floor.
Although not absolutely necessary, it is nevertheless recommended that a layer of 3mm thick underlay foam should be laid. This is an inexpensive measure which reduces impact sound and helps to even out minor irregularities. If you are laying wood flooring onto a concrete floor we would recommend a layer of polyethylene Vapour Barrier (This is laid first, followed by the underlay foam).
As it is not absolutely necessary to lay either the Vapour Barrier or the Underlay Foam, there are no installation guidelines detailed here – however, if it is your intention to lay either of these products, details can be found in the General Installation pages. Please follow the link on the menu system.

figure1

First decide which way the boards are going to lie. Lay the first plank in the corner with the groove side of both the short end and the long side to the wall. Insert expansion wedges between the plank and the wall.

figure2

If you have to saw off the end of the last plank in a row to fit the dimension of the room, lay that plank next to the previous one so that the tongues meet. Push the groove end right up to the wall and saw the plank off so as to leave a 10mm space between the plank and the wall. Don’t apply glue yet.

figure3

If the wall is not straight, cut a small block to a suitable length and slide it along the wall, simultaneously marking the curve it makes along the planks. If you saw the planks along this line it will fit the curvature of the wall exactly.

figure1

Now you can start to glue. Apply the glue into the grooves of the short ends of the plank. The glue should be applied to the upper edge of the groove.

figure4

Place an expansion wedge between the last plank and the wall and lever the planks into place using a last board jemmy between the plank and the wedge.

figure6

Apply glue into the groove along the whole length and width of the plank. Remove any excess glue immediately. You should need approximately 100g of glue per m2.

figure1

Start the next row with the remaining piece of the last plank. Apply glue along the entire length of the groove and press the groove against the tongue of the plank in the previous row. Standing on the planks, butt the block up against the outer tongue of the planks and strike the board home along its whole length from the outer edge.

figure1

To fit the last plank, lay it on top of the previous row. Then take another board and lay it with the tongue side to the wall.Draw the line along which you are going to saw the plank to the correct width along the grooved side. Apply glue into the grooves. Lever the last row into place using a last board jemmy. Finally, insert wedges between the plank and the wall.

figure1

If you are installing the floor crosswise in a narrow corridor or passageway you will get the best results by joining the panels at the ends every second row

figure1

Drill a hole 20mm larger than the outer diameter of the pipe and saw a wedge which will fit the hole in the wood flooring.Hide the gap between the pipe and the panel with a plastic cover. There should be at least 60mm between radiator’s and walls.

figure1

Use threshold rods in doorways or when the length of the floor laid crosswise exceeds 6 metres. Threshold rods should be attached to the subfloor in such a way as to allow the parquet to move freely.

figure1

Leave sufficient space to fit the parquet around the door-frames. Lay a piece of parquet next to the frame and saw around the base of the frame at the level of the top surface of the panel. Remove the sawn-off piece of frame with a chisel and fit the parquet under the frame.